10 Tips for surviving first year of University

1) Ensure that you do in depth research about your university, your course and the area that you will be living in. This is so important, as if you fail to do so you may not enjoy your course or the University. If you want a more city lifestyle – then London would be more suited. If you chose, for example in Colchester, it’s much more rural, so would suit students who prefer this.

2) Make sure that you book your accommodation early to ensure that you can settle in ASAP. I did enjoy staying on campus in first year as it was much more convenient. I chose the quieter ‘more expensive’ flats whereas some of mine stayed in the cheaper ‘party’ flats – but said they socialised a lot and made a strong connection of friends.

3) Start buying home bits for your room early. You will need items such as: bedding, toiletries, kitchen appliances, sponges, towels and so forth. A good place to get the small bits is Wilkonson’s or online. I  recommend buying some food that you can quickly grab in case that you are running low.

4) Have a comfortable notepad, which contains good quality paper and is in a large quantity. This will be the most important item that you can have at University. When writing your notes, re-read them after every lecture and/or rewrite them to look neater. Some people prefer a laptop, however I preferred the more traditional approach as I found that I store it a lot more and don’t get distracted… Oh and a nice bag that can fit this in and also the capacity to store a large amount of books!

5) Go to every lecture, unless it is absolutely impossible. This helps you to understand the material, but also to stay on track and be organised.

6) Do your reading on the list every week! This will truly help you to understand the material and will. be so beneficial for second and third year.

7) If you have any questions… ask! Whether its peer or lecturers ensure you ask, and I’m sure they will be able to answer for you.

8) Most students have the view that ‘I don’t care about first year, as it doesn’t count’. This is the wrong approach, as I’ve learnt from experience that although it doesn’t physically goes towards your grade, it makes a huge difference for your modules in second and third year, so is important  in the long run.

9) Remember that you do get holidays, so you can visit your friends and family where you are free.

10) Although you need to be focusing on your studies, when the work Is done, don’t forget to let your hair down, socialise and go out. This is the year for settling into a new accommodation, studies and friendship groups. I’m not going to lie you may feel homesick at first and a little in the deep end, but once you settle in it will soon be like a second home.

Share any tips you may have ❤ OX

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Five things I learned at the age of 23

  1. Not everything in life goes to plan – and thats okay

    You may have had a designated ‘life plan’ in mind, but you may get side tracked. Thats fine, and perfectly normal. You may stray down a different route entirely, or simply find your way back – but either way that is the pathway that you was meant to meet, and you will eventually end up where your meant to be. It may be ideal to have some idea of where you want to go, but it is important to also live your life in the present, as opposed to the past or the future.

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2. Bad things happen, it is inevitable.

Everyone is going to experience a bad day, some worse than others. You may observe that someone has had a bad day, experience or event and feel somewhat sympathetic or if not unsympathetic towards them. But, the truth is, that you are likely to experience a situation similar to them at some point in your life, but may be of a higher or lesser extent. Therefore, it’s important to take today for what it is now, but to perhaps offer a shoulder for anyone experiencing a ‘bad’ day, as we all need it from time to time. But, also to prepare yourself for days that may not be as fortunate as the ones that you are experiencing now.

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3) ‘Adulting’ is hard, incredibly hard.

What with the rising mortgages, cars, expenditure etc it is hard to even get your foot in the doorstep, especially now in the 21st century. I’m still trying to get my head round this, but it’s important to begin to think partially about your future, as every little step is a milestone closer to becoming a somewhat ‘adult’. Start by researching with an open mind, and then you have plenty of time to build up to being an ‘adult’, you will have to have patience and not rush into anything.

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4) Focus on your own life.

I found that some people are tempted to get wrapped up in other peoples lives, that they don’t focus on their own. I think that it’s crucial to put your own life as a priority, and work on becoming a better version of yourself. Not to worry about the opinions of others so much, unless it’s positive or constructive. Focus on your dreams, get a hobby, go for a run – be proactive.

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5) Don’t take anything for granted – anything at all.

You may be so caught up in your everyday routine that you forget to take life for what it is. To socialise with your family and friends, trips to the beach, just appreciate the sound of nature. All these things are taken for granted in return for focusing on our working lives. Although this is at the forefront, we need to not forget to appreciate the fact that we are living, but also that we have our friends and relatives present. But ultimately, the world is your:

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Thank you for reading ❤

If there is anything you learned by your present age, feel free to comment 🙂 OX

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